GIS Day 2017!

As it does every year, GIS Day snuck up on me! From the GIS Day page, you can see local events as well as some really cool visualization/data projects (My favorites are the 100 Years of the NPS and Lakota Language). ESRI’s GeoNet community will also lead you to some interesting information. One of my favorite non-science databases is Social Explorer, which allows you to visually explore all types of demographic data. Other cool/interesting sites include:

  • Atlas of Early Printing: an interactive timeline that traces the spread of printing in conjunction with trade routes, paper mills and other factors.
  • Atlas of the Biosphere: Provides visualized information about the environment and human interactions with the environment.It contains maps with geographically explicit data broken down into four general categories (Humans, Land Use, Ecosystems, and Water Resources) and animated schematics that look at the various resource flows and pools that make up individual Earth systems.
  • CityNature combines spatial analysis of parks and other natural areas in cities with text mining of planning documents and published historical narratives to explore why.
  • HealthMap: deliver real-time intelligence on a broad range of emerging infectious diseases. (Spoiler alert: Either we are pretty lucky in PDX or our outbreaks aren’t getting reported.)
  • Herodotus’s Histories: all the place names mapped so you can follow in Herodotus’s footsteps. Virtually.
  • Landscope America & other NatureServe maps: brings together maps, data, photos, and stories about America’s natural places and open spaces to inform and inspire conservation.
  • Mapping Inequality: Redlining in New Deal America: I’m not sure this one really needs an explanation. Looking at the area description/security map of each area makes me sad.
  • National Geologic Map Database: a distributed archive of standardized geoscience information.
  • Racial Dot Map: an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country.
  • ShakeMap: from the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program. An accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country.

Looking for books about GIS? Try some of these:
Encyclopedia of GIS
Qualitative GIS: A mixed Methods Approach
GIS Research Methods: Incorporating Spatial Perspectives
A Primer of GIS
The Spatial Humanities GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship